Validating xml document

In real life, we also need to give an XML processor some way of checking the syntax (also called the grammar) of an XML document to make sure the data remains intact.

validating xml document-63

In XML, you define what's legal and what's not by specifying the syntax you're going to allow for an XML document.

There are two ways to validate XML documents—with document type definitions (DTDs) and with XML schemas.

Topics covered by Feb 2nd 2016: In this lesson we will learn the concept of "layout" in the specific context of Android Application Development, we will compare the two different ways we have to generate layouts and we will go through some very basic examples of XML code with the corresponding screen output.

I have built a list of around 70 interview questions that you could potentially face at a job interview.

Today and tomorrow cover DTDs, and Days 6, "Creating Valid XML Documents: XML Schemas," and 7, "Creating Your Own Types in XML Schemas," cover XML schemas.

Here's an overview of today's topics: DTDs provided the original way to validate XML documents, and the syntax for DTDs is built right in to the XML 1.0 specification.

The likelihood is high that there are going to be errors in all that data entry. The formal rules for DTDs are available in the XML 1.0 recommendation,

(Note that the XML 1.1 candidate recommendation has nothing to add about DTDs as of this writing.) We define the syntax of an XML document by using a DTD, and we declare that definition in a document by using a document type declaration.

In HTML, a browser can check HTML because it knows all about legal HTML.

In XML, you define what's legal and what's not by specifying the syntax you're going to allow for an XML document. Steve Holzner shows you how to validate XML documents with document type definitions (DTDs).

Tons of XML processors out there use DTDs in XML documents, and DTDs are the first step in any discussion on validation.

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